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Tuesday, May 12, 2020 | History

2 edition of waste land as Grail romance: Eliot"s use of the medieval Grail legends found in the catalog.

waste land as Grail romance: Eliot"s use of the medieval Grail legends

Everett Gillis

waste land as Grail romance: Eliot"s use of the medieval Grail legends

by Everett Gillis

  • 108 Want to read
  • 17 Currently reading

Published by Texas Tech Press] in [Lubbock .
Written in English

    Places:
  • England
    • Subjects:
    • Eliot, T. S. 1888-1965.,
    • Eliot, T. S. 1888-1965 -- Knowledge -- Literature.,
    • Arthurian romances -- Adaptations -- History and criticism.,
    • Grail -- Legends -- History and criticism.,
    • Medievalism -- England -- History -- 20th century.,
    • Quests (Expeditions) in literature.,
    • American poetry -- Celtic influences.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references.

      Statement[by] Everett A. Gillis.
      SeriesTexas Tech University. Graduate studies ;, no. 6, Graduate studies (Texas Tech University) ;, no. 6.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsPS3509.L43 W3648
      The Physical Object
      Pagination26 p.
      Number of Pages26
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL5170627M
      LC Control Number74622354

        • The medieval waste land of the fisher king, a myth which is closely related with the grail legend. In this waste land soldier of king fisher ravished the nun of the chapels perilous said to contain the holy grail and because of that king became important and his land suffered from famine. Weston’s basic argument is that the origin of the medieval Grail romances are pagan fertility rituals. The Waste Land is not a rehashing of that thesis. In fact, Eliot’s medieval romance – and, by extension, literature itself – is the symptom of the loss of this Less than a year after publishing The Waste Land, Eliot wrote an File Size: KB.

      The basic symbol used, that of the waste land, is taken, of course, from Miss Jessie Weston's From Ritual to Romance. In the legends which she treats there, the land has been blighted by a curse. The crops do not grow, and the animals cannot reproduce. The Waste Land is a poem by T. S. Eliot, widely regarded as one of the most important poems of the 20th century and a central work of modernist poetry. Published in , the line poem first appeared in the United Kingdom in the October issue of Eliot's The Criterion and in the United States in the November issue of The was published in book form in December Author: T. S. Eliot.

      The Grail, according to medieval legend, was the cup used by Christ at the Last Supper. Subsequently, it became the object of quests by knights. "Indeed," Eliot wrote in his notes to The Waste Land, "Miss Weston's book will elucidate the difficulties of the poem much better than my notes can do." And, he adds, "I recommend [the book] to any who. Jessie Weston is an absolute pleasure to read. Her volume on the origin of the Grail romances is an absolute must for those interested in the Arthurian cycle, fans of J.G. Frazer and other antiquarians of the "Myth and Ritual" school, students studying T.S. Eliot's The Wasteland, or those simply looking for a unique perspective on how practical problems of the human condition weave their way 4/5(24).


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Waste land as Grail romance: Eliot"s use of the medieval Grail legends by Everett Gillis Download PDF EPUB FB2

In acknowledging his indebtedness in the notes section of The Waste Land to Jessie L. Weston’s From Ritual to Romance1—a seminal study of the medieval Grail sagas against the background of the ancient Mystery cults of Greece and Rome—Eliot declares that not only his title but the “plan” and, to a large degree, the “incidental symbolism” of his poem owe to his reading of her work; that her book.

Get this from a library. The waste land as Grail romance: Eliot's use of the medieval Grail legends. [Everett Gillis]. The Waste Land as Grail Romance: Eliot's Use of the Medieval Grail Legends By Everett A. Gillis Texas Tech press, Read preview Overview Reading the Waste Land: Modernism and the Limits of Interpretation By Jewel Spears Brooker; Joseph Bentley University of Massachusetts Press, From Ritual to Romance is a scholarly work that studies in great detail the various legends of the Holy Grail.

In it Weston uses such terms as “Fisher King” and “Waste Land,” and also delves into the importance of the Tarot pack –- which Eliot uses as a prop in the Madame Sosostris episode. There is one other issue with From Ritual to Romance which I will address before getting into what all this Grail biz means for The Waste Land.

From what I understand, thanks to the forward of the book itself, written by a cat called Robert Segal, who is presumably a medieval scholar, From Ritual to Romance is largely irrelevant to medieval.

From Ritual to Romance helped elucidate not only allusions The Waste Land makes but the way in which it references ancient connections between the Grail legends and the Rig-Velda, though parallels, are said by Weston not to be “the direct sources of the Grail legend” (Weston 30).Eliot is entirely deliberate in his parallels, but in the same way he is updating ancient ideas.

Acknowledged by T. Eliot as one of the chief sources for his great poem "The Waste Land," Jessie L. Weston's From Ritual to Romance remains a landmark of anthropological and mythological scholarship. In this book she explores the origins of the Grail legend, arguing that it dates back to a primitive vegetation cult and only later was shaped by Celtic and Christian lore/5.

Description. This is From Ritual to Romance (), one of the books named in the notes at the back of T S Eliot’s The Waste Land (). Not only the title, but the plan and a good deal of the incidental symbolism of the poem were suggested by Miss Jessie.

L Weston’s book on the Grail legend. Joseph Campbell's Romance of the Grail: The Magic and Mystery of Arthurian Myth helps bring order to a confusing series of sources that began as legitimate folklore only to be hijacked by monastic writers who imposed a Christian structure on the myth.

Campbell is particularly helpful dealing with the myth of Tristan and Iseult, Parzival as seen by Eschenbach, and the elements of the Grail myth, the Fisher King, and the Waste Land/5.

In the poem “The Waste Land”, he has used Holy Grail myth, Vegetation and Fertility myth etc. Hindu myth and Biblical interpretations have also been manifested in the poem.

To know and discuss Eliot’s poem, it is very important to go through and realize the notes of Eliot on his poem. Although the Grail legend is a significant plot in The Waste Land, Eliot’s use of additional connotations from such works as Dante’s Inferno, Shakespearean plays, and even the Bible, supply more thematic information for the reader to use in understanding the poem as a whole.

References outside of European literature show that the themes in the poem transcend time and. T. Eliot’s The Waste Land uses the Fisher King and Grail mythology from medieval romance cycles.

The poem establishes themes of humanity’s mortal existence and spiritual thirst for redemption from depravity and suffering, while simultaneously demonstrating these themes’ relevance to contemporary society. Repeatedly the poem invokes imagery from various myths and legend to.

n the earliest form of the Grail romances, according to Weston, the lord of the Grail castle was neither old nor infirm, but was on account of the death of this knight that misfortune had fallen upon the land.

In all of the Perceval versions, however, it was the king who had been wounded (or, in the case of the Didot Perceval only, grown old) and this was the cause of the wasting of. The Waste Land as Grail Romance: Eliot's Use of the Medieval Grail Legends By Everett A.

Gillis Texas Tech press, Read preview Overview Text or Presence: On Rereading the /Xam and the Interpretation of Their Narratives By Wessels, Michael Journal of Literary Studies, Vol.

24, No. 3, September The Waste Land as Grail Romance: Eliot's Use of the Medieval Grail Legends By Everett A. Gillis Texas Tech press, Read preview Overview The Poetry of T. Eliot By D. Maxwell Routledge & Kegan Paul,   The Chapel Perilous was the final stage of the Grail quest in medieval romance cycles, represented in The Waste Land as “the violet hour” (Eliot ).

This passage sees the narrator entering the climax of the poem, and it is here that the Quester encounters the. Myths in The waste Land 1. Name-Pandya Riva m Roll no Paper-9 Topic-Myths in The Waste Land 2. Thomas Stearns Eliot was a British essayist, publisher, playwright, literary and social critic and one of the 20th century’s major poet.

He born on 26 September and died on 4 January The Waste Land is one of his long and famous poem of modernism. He shows his. superior in degree to other men and to his environment.5 The Waste Land is based largely in both myth and romance, as Eliot fuses the myth of a dying god and the chivalric romance of the Holy Grail quest.

The poem’s Notes direct the reader to James G. Frazer’s Golden Bough () and Jessie L. Weston’s book From Ritual to Romance. As I mentioned in my introductory post, T.S.

Eliot’s The Waste Land was influenced dramatically by Jessie L. Weston’s book From Ritual to Romance, which focuses on the medieval cycles about the Fisher King, the Holy Grail, and other aspects of what we normally call “Arthurian Legends.” The Fisher King is the guardian of the Grail, and his close proximity to this object of supernatural.

Whether it is a cup of plenty or the container of Christ's blood, the Holy Grail has always been a symbol of aspiration and longing. This volume surveys representations of the Holy Grail in literature, art, and film from the Middle Ages to the present : Paperback.

was born inin St. Louis, Missouri. His first work was “The love song of Prufrock” in he wrote the poem “The Waste Land” while recovering from the exhaustion. From to he returned back to Harvard where he expanded his knowledge by reading Indian philosophy and studying Sanskrit.Acknowledged by T.

S. Eliot as one of the chief sources for his great poem "The Waste Land," Jessie L. Weston's From Ritual to Romance remains a landmark of anthropological and mythological scholarship. In this book she explores the origins of the Grail legend, arguing that it dates back to a primitive vegetation cult and only later was shaped by Celtic and Christian lore.Eliot said that the source of the title, theme and imagery of ‘The Waste Land’ was the medieval legend of the Fisher King: Not only the title, but the plan and a good deal of the incidental symbolism of the poem were suggested by Miss Jessie L.

Weston’s book on the Grail legend: From Ritual to Romance.